January 17, 2020

Drinking Water Input for the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee

A comment composed by members of the National Drinking Water Alliance was signed by 62 individuals and 13 organizations and submitted to the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) for the 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs).  

The comment urged the DGAC to include in their report, strong language recommending that the new 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans state explicitly and unequivocally that water should be first for thirst and should be consumed in place of sugar-sweetened beverages. Further, the comment urges the needed steps be taken to add a symbol for water to the MyPlate graphic.

Read the full comment here.

Add your voice!

May 1, 2020 is the announced date for the close of public comments to the DGAC. The DGAC will then complete their report and submit it to the departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HSS) for translation into the 2020 DGAs as well as to make...

December 18, 2019

On Wednesday, December 11th, 69 Members of Congress urged the secretaries of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to take the necessary steps to add a symbol for water to the MyPlate nutritional graphic.

The MyPlate graphic is the primary tool used to educate Americans about nutrition and is ubiquitous in school and childcare cafeterias, classrooms and beyond. But it’s missing one essential element of a healthy diet: WATER!

The letter highlighted the vital role water plays for Americans of all ages, especially for very young children. The 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (currently under development) will, for the first time, provide guidelines for children from birth through 24 months.

Recently released consensus recommendations from a group of leading national organizations including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association stress the importance of water, along with milk, as a beverage of ch...

July 1, 2019

Developing healthy beverage habits early in childhood is key—but too many young children routinely consume sugary drinks, and a sizable minority consume no water at all. Luckily, the next edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans is currently under development and will provide advocates and researchers the opportunity to comment for the very first time on standards for children aged 0-24 months.

Just in time, a newly released policy brief, Infant and Toddler Beverage Recommendations for the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, from the Nutrition Policy Institute, dives deep into what young children are drinking today, as well as what they should be drinking and how that information should influence the next edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Researchers agree: sugar-sweetened beverages have no place in young children’s diets and the new Dietary Guidelines provide a critical opportunity for America to get its beverage guidance for young children right....

May 7, 2019

May 5th through 11th is National Drinking Water Week (NDWW), a once a year opportunity to educate the public, connect the community and promote drinking water at the places we live, work and play.

Here are some NDWW highlights from around the world of drinking water:

  • The Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation brought their Water First Trailer to the annual Gathering of Nations Powwow, educating and providing thousands of powwow-goers with a healthy alternative to soda and other sugary beverages. They served a variety of infused waters and indigenous teas. See more here on the NB3 Foundation’s Facebook page.

  • Brush up on the basics with Community Water Center’s Frequently Asked Questions page. Providing clear information in Spanish and English, this resource helps consumers learn about where their water comes from and how to get information on water quality.

  • The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced $87 million in new funding to assist states,...

March 22, 2019

The process to develop the 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) reflects changes intended to bring greater transparency and offer additional avenues for public input.

On March 28 and 29, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will hold the first of five 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee meetings that are open to the public. The meeting will feature deliberations by its 20 members, all experts in their fields. They will review scientific evidence on specific nutrition- and health-related topics and scientific questions that, for the first time, reflect both public comments and federal agency input.

Furthermore, an ongoing public comment period opened on March 12 and will remain open throughout the DGA development process. The public and all stakeholders are encouraged to provide comments to the Committee on topics and supporting questions that will yield new 2020 Guidelines.

In this round of DGA develo...

February 26, 2019

The next stage of the development of the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) is underway with the recent appointment of 20 nationally recognized scientists to serve on the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The committee will review scientific evidence on specific nutrition and health related topics and scientific questions that, for the first time, reflect both public comments and federal agency input. The public and other stakeholders will be encouraged to provide comments and feedback throughout the committee's deliberations.

The National Drinking Water Alliance is leading an ongoing national campaign to urge USDA and HHS to add a symbol for drinking water to the MyPlate graphic when revising the DGAs. Visit our Take Action page for more information about the DGAs development process and opportunities to make your voice heard.

The DGAs are updated every five years and serve as the cornerstone of federal nutrition programs and policies, providing food- a...

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