February 26, 2020

Water is a basic human need—something kids cannot live without. Because children spend so much time at school, having fresh, clean water available to them is critical for them to live healthier lives. 

All kids in every school in the United States should have access to water at no cost while they’re on campus. When kids don’t have enough water to drink, their health and cognitive performance, particularly their short-term memory, may suffer. And, when water is not available, children tend to consume more sugary drinks, which are linked to chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

You can learn more about the importance of drinking water in Voices for Healthy Kids Water Access in Schools Fast Facts

Inside this document, you’ll find facts from up-to-date studies and “fast facts” written in consumer-friendly language. Voices for Healthy Kids, an initiative of the American Heart Association with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), has a science...

February 21, 2020

A new fact sheet aims to demystify tap water contamination and provide clear information on tap water safety for childcare providers and for parents of young children.

There are over 20 million children aged 5 and under in the United States and over half of them attend center-based childcare (as opposed to care by friends and family).  Facilities participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) are required to make potable (safe) water available and offered throughout the day. States may have their own more stringent licensing requirements for drinking water provision in childcare and other states may require all licensed childcare facilities to comply with CACFP standards. But all families with young children should have safe drinking water.

Lead is a particular concern in the early years because young children are most vulnerable to its toxic effects. Infants fed formula that is reconstituted with tap water are at highest risk, if the tap water has unsafe le...

February 4, 2020

First established in 1991, the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) was developed to control the contaminants in drinking water by requiring water utilities to test tap water for lead and use corrosion control to prevent leaching of lead into water. However, it had substantial shortcomings, and the agency began the lengthy process to propose long-term revisions to overhaul the rule in 2010.

Last October, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its proposed revisions to the LCR and is accepting public comment until February 12, 2020.

Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has launched a series of blogs assessing the revisions and recommending improvements:

Overview: "Despite its flaws, states and communities should get ahead of the curve on EPA’s proposed lead in drinking water rule" (Dec. 10). Provides an overview of key strengths and weaknesses in the proposal and highlights opportunities for proactive action by states and communities.

Lead Service Lines: "EDF asks EPA to strengthen k...

December 4, 2019

Drinking water should be featured on MyPlate and be strongly advised in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans provide the basis for federal food, nutrition and health policies and programs – including all federal food programs, institutional procurement policies, nutrition education programs – as well as nutritional advice given by health care providers.  The Guidelines are updated every five years. New Guidelines are due to be released in 2020.

In 2015, the Advisory Committee for the that year’s guidelines made strong recommendations supporting drinking water promotion in the 2015 Guidelines:

  • “Strategies are needed to encourage the U.S. population to drink water when they are thirsty. Water provides a healthy, low-cost, zero-calorie beverage option,” (1)

  • “Approaches might include: Making water a preferred beverage choice. Encourage water as a preferred beverage when thirsty.” (2)

  • “Free, clean water should be available in public...

November 26, 2019

The Bigger Pictureworks with youth to highlight how Type 2 Diabetes impacts communities, using poetry and music as tools to inspire young people to take action. Through learning, conversation, engagement and advocacy, young people fight Type 2 Diabetes in their communities

A recent campaign, created with support from Metta Fund and Mount Zion Health Fund, provides a workshop to youth poets in the Bay Area. The workshop helps them address how inequitable access to fresh water, combined with sugary drink consumption, influences Type 2 diabetes rates among youth.


Ten beautifully powerful poems were created, and one was transformed into The Bigger Picture’s most recent film, “Bottled Up,” which you can watch above.

Film and Photos by Jamie deWolf

October 29, 2019

Think you can go 30 days without drinking a sugary beverage?

This November, challenge yourself to live a healthier life by choosing water instead of sugary drinks and take the NB3 Foundation’s Zero to 60 challenge.

Why? Soda is the number one source of added sugar in the American diet and more than 30 percent of all calories from added sugars consumed daily come from sweetened beverages. Excessive consumption of sugar can lead to weight gain and increase the risk of chronic diseases, including diabetes and heart disease. Reducing sugar-sweetened beverage intake and drinking more water is key first step towards good health.

To rise to the occasion, challenge participants must drink 60 ounces of water—about 8 glasses—and eliminate all sodas, sweet teas, energy drinks and sports beverages from their diet.

NB3 Foundationoffers five helpful tips that will help you, your colleagues or students be successful all month:

  • Remove all sugary drinks from your home

  • Motivate yourself an...